#inspiredbystories

Bookmarks: What Managers Read

Where do managers get inspiration from? And what are the takeaways for personal and professional life? We asked five experts from Hager Unternehmensberatung to present us their favorite books – fiction and non-fiction

Yvonne Klein, Talent Acquisition

Yvonne Klein

 “Nur wer sichtbar ist, findet auch statt” by Tijen Onaran

What it’s about:

This career guide is all about personal branding. Tijen Onaran supports people in positioning themselves and shaping their individual perception with helpful tips, numerous examples and challenges.

Key Takeaways:

Limiting yourself to 2-3 topics that you stand for and are passionate about.

Post regularly, share and/or comment on content related to these topics.

Find your own tone, style and channel and stay consistent.

Best Sentence:

“If you want more women in leadership positions for example, there’s hardly a better way for you as a woman than to become visible yourself – and that’s regardless of whether or not you already hold a leadership position.”

About the Author:

Tijen Onaran is an entrepreneur, best-selling author, moderator, and speaker. With her company Global Digital Women, she is committed to the networking and the visibility of women in the digital industry and advises companies on diversity issues and communication. ‘Manager Magazin’ ranks her among the 100 most influential women in German business, and she is one of a handful of top influencers worldwide on LinkedIn.

Stefanie Nagel, Business Software Unit Manager

Stefanie Nagel

 “Ganz bei mir: Leidenschaft Achttausender” by Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner

What it’s about:

Curiosity. Longing. Shock. Closeness. Will. Courage. Fear. Horror. Hope. Determination. Happiness. Despair. Serenity. Joy. Perseverance. Fulfillment. These 16 words stand for 16 chapters and 14 eight-thousanders. Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner was the first woman to reach all of them without artificial oxygen. In her autobiography, she describes her mountain experiences, her role as a woman in the male-dominated alpine world and her attitude toward mountaineering.

Key Takeaways:

With passion and tireless ambition and perseverance, Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner achieves her goals as a true power woman. She doesn’t give up in the face of setbacks and has a very positive attitude and a strong sense of optimism.

Best sentence:

“I want to take pleasure in what I do.”

About the author:

The Austrian has made alpine history. Gerlinde Kaltenbrunner is a trained nurse and started professional mountaineering via detours. She passes on her experiences and adventures in workshops and seminars. For many years, she has inspired people from a wide range of cultures, religions and social backgrounds.

Angela Keuneke, Marketing Manager

Die Farbe vom Glück” by Clara Maria Bagus

What it’s about:

“Die Farbe vom Glück” (“The Color of Happiness”) is an incredibly great novel. Clara Maria Bagus tells the story of three families whose lives are changed forever by a bad decision. A judge forces a nurse to exchange his terminally ill newborn for a healthy one. If she does not follow his threat, he deprives her of her foster son. The lives of all involved are thrown off kilter, but behind it all, the mysterious plan of life is at work. A book that captivates until the end and surprises with new twists. Brilliantly written.

Key Takeaways:

A very clever, wise novel in which everyone finds their color of happiness.

Best Sentence:

“People differ in their dreams; in their hopes they are all alike.”

About the author:

Clara Maria Bagus studied psychology in the U.S. and Germany and spent some time working in brain research. Her life’s journey took her across numerous continents. There, she met again and again people in search of themselves. With her books she has helped people to find the red thread of their life again.

Christine Trimpel, Industrial Business Unit Manager

Christine Trimpel 

“Becoming” by Michelle Obama

What it’s about:

The biography of Michelle Obama describes her development from a child from humble beginnings to a successful lawyer and finally First Lady of the USA. Her life was driven by ambition and the permanent need to prove herself, in order to compensate for the double disadvantage of being a dark-skinned woman – for example at Princeton University, where African-Americans were clearly outnumbered, accounting for nine percent of the student body and where there were only half as many women as men. In her mid-20s, Michelle Obama led the classic lifestyle of a high-performer with lots of overtime, happy hours with successful friends, Armani suits and subscriptions to a wine merchant. When Barack Obama came into her life as a summer intern, she was struck by his easy-going nature, disdain for status symbols and financial security – but most of all, his desire to make a real difference. That inspired her to take a job at City Hall as an assistant to the mayor, where she earned half her previous salary, but was happier because she could make a difference. She also later won many sympathies as First Lady, because she remained authentic and unorthodox in pursuing the issues she personally found meaningful – including supporting her husband on the campaign trail and as president by temporarily putting her own professional goals on hold.

Key Takeaways:

Working hard can lead to following what you think is a dream career, but one that doesn’t correspond with your own happiness at all. Breaking out of this takes especially great courage, but it is precisely the social ideals that we should question most critically.

Best sentence:

“If you don’t get out there and define yourself, you’ll be quickly and inaccurately defined by others.”

Sahar Faraji, Business Unit Manager

Sahar Faraji

 “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People” by Stephen R. Covey.

What it’s about:

Stephen R. Covey’s book is a classic of success literature on the subject of effectiveness. It is about reconciling the inner one’s character and thus the only thing we can influence with the outer, i.e. the external world. Covey has established seven principles for this purpose. The first three relate to oneself, how to proactively change and develop in order to achieve the right goal. In the subsequent chapters, he reflects on behavior toward others, such as friends, family, superiors and so on. The credo is: First understand, then be understood. Working on oneself is the most significant investment – so take time to work on yourself.

Key Takeaways:

A good guide to building your communication with those around you into a cooperative partnership.

Best Sentence:

“True independence of character gives us the power to make ourselves rather than be ‘made’.”

About the Author:

Stephen R. Covey studied business administration at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. He earned his MBA from Harvard University, followed by a Doctor of Religious Education (DRE) degree from Brigham Young University. Corvey was considered one of the world’s most important management thinkers and was named one of the 25 most influential people by Time magazine in 1996. In addition to numerous self-help books, Covey is also an author of religious tracts. The father of nine children died in 2012 from the late effects of a bicycle accident.

This article is part of a content cooperation between FemaleOneZero (F10) and Hager Unternehmensberatung. The company, which specializes in executive search, has repeatedly been named one of the best personnel consultancies in Germany by the magazines WirtschaftsWoche and Focus. Hager Unternehmensberatung employs around 110 people and, in addition to its extensive know-how in the field of digitalization, is also considered a specialist in issues relating to diversity and innovation.